Author: mmb_admin

19: Chad Keck

19: Chad Keck

Breakthrough ideas with Chad: 

  • It is possible to out-envision your vision by building and buying too much.
  • How do you lead when your available ministry budget is less than 5%?
  • How do you lead active ministry when there are no resources?
  • Relationships and caring for people do not require a lot of money.
  • What might God do If you set aside substantial time to pray every Sunday?
  • What if prayer in your worship services was more than just a transition?
  • What if prayer in your staff and congregation was more than something you did and was something you are?
  • Prayer turns the mentality of your church from “what can we do?” to “what can God do?”
  • Instead of asking why did God allow this? What if you asked, “what is God doing in this?”
  • The great commission does not call us to “Go and Build Buildings.”
  • Inward focus distracts from your outward calling.
  • Until the problems of who is not here become a greater focus than the preferences of who is already here you will starve the Great Commission.
  • When it seems like every obvious clue says no way, sometimes the Spirit says go anyway.
  • There is no church that God is not big enough to revive.
  • You can only play the “…because I’m the pastor” card once.
  • Trust is built by being transparent and deal directly and honestly with critical issues.
  • Your church has a functional mission, survival, making a budget, building a building.
  • It doesn’t cost anything to train people and become a more welcoming church.
  • Does your structure help you accomplish the mission or does it stand in the way of your mission?
  • When is it time to change your structure from committees to elders?
  • In most cases, you will struggle to out-give an overbearing debt but you can out-grow the debt by making disciples.
  • Whether you’ve incurred or inherited an overwhelming debt, reaching and making disciples impacts more than campaigning.
  • Nothing inspires people about getting out of debt, but life change moves hearts and minds.
  • It doesn’t cost any money to make a couple of calls and recruit volunteers to welcome THIS SUNDAY.
  • Embracing the outsider with hospitality is reaching people as Jesus commanded.
  • There is a way out, no matter the size debt or challenges, God is bigger than those moments.
  • Stick with what God has planted in your heart – when He called you to the church, God knew what the problems were even if you didn’t.
  • Own your mistakes and be honest – genuinely love your people, and they will love you back.
  • Practice tactical patience, you don’t have to get involved in every situation.
  • God will honor faithfulness – He loves your church more than you do
  • Is there a difference in giving God your “first time” versus your “best time” every day?
  • Why is it important to be gentle and friendly with those you disagree with?
  • How do you shift from assuming the worst in disagreement to thinking the best in someone?

Breakthrough resources:

Brothers, We Are Not Professionals by John Piper

The Treasure Principle by Randy Alcorn

I Am a Church Member by Thom Rainer

 

Chad Keck currently serves as the Senior Pastor of FBC Kettering, OH. He is married to Candace, and they have four children; Hadley, Shepherd, John, and Calvin. Chad also is an adjunct professor at Cedarville University and works for the Executive Committee of the SBC as a Cooperative Program Catalyst. He loves to snow ski, read, and travel.

Episode #18: Greg Gibbs

Episode #18: Greg Gibbs

Breakthrough ideas with Greg:

  • Opening your home, giving people access to you, can be a spiritual commitment.
  • The second someone walks through the door into your home; people can sniff out love, acceptance, and grace.
  • Could your home be a better place to invite someone than the church if you genuinely want to share the love of Jesus?
  • The future of Jesus people in America may just be delivering the gospel life on life and kitchen to kitchen?
  • Generosity is a family heritage that can be passed along from generation to generation.
  • Fundraising is not just a Pastor’s necessary evil like taking your vitamins… it is a vital leadership discipline.
  • Your congregation can grow spiritually when you call them to sacrifice financially.
  • Generosity is a spiritual muscle that must be warmed and used regularly.
  • Taking risks of faith reminds us that God is the great provider.
  • Jesus is on to something here… Money matters.
  • Jesus doesn’t need our money, but he does want our hearts.
  • Money captures the heart of people; that’s why Jesus talked about it so much.
  • Generosity and fundraising are categories of discipleship that create explosive spiritual growth.
  • There’s something being a church that has enough critical mass and resources to serve the community but lives small enough to feel like a family.
  • Most pastors are not trained to disciple people with whole life generosity.
  • Every pastoral leader deals with the fear of talking about money; it’s not just you.
  • Jesus doesn’t give us any right to not talk about one of the most significant sources of anxiety in the life of people: money.
  • It is malpractice for a pastor to not address the topic of money and possessions in the lives and hearts of the people in their congregation.
  • Jesus likes the topic of money… you are in good hands when you talk about money.
  • Bring up money in a gracious, confident way and normalize the conversation about generosity. We cannot-not talk about money if we are going to lead people to dependence on Christ.
  • Generosity and how we deal with our stuff is a daily topic, not an annual topic. Talk about it regularly.
  • If you only talk about money in crisis or budgetary terms, what you are saying is that giving is a financial transaction. Jesus doesn’t allow us to see generosity as a transactional practice.
  • Understanding the true nature of generosity is at the core of discipleship.
  • How can you grow someone in their dependence on God and following of Him if you do not talk about their money?
  • Breakthrough happens when generosity is normalized, as a part of people discipling – not church budgeting.
  • Does the topic of generosity need to come up in sermons on marriage and work? If you are normalizing generosity, it does.
  • Pastors need to share their generosity journey, their fears and struggles to normalize generosity.
  • When church leaders are nitpicking about theology around the tithe and giving, they’re typically NOT seeking ways to be MORE generous.
  • What if every member of your congregation acted as you do in the category of generosity? What kind of church would it be?
  • Pastor, is your life, and your generosity, worth emulating by your congregation?
  • Generosity affects every part of your ability to lead well in the church.
  • God doesn’t need your money to do His work, but He sure seems to use it.
  • Put money in its place and then continue to pursue what it means to live with generosity.
  • What if there was a how-to guide for churches that are trying to run discipleship based capital campaigns?
  • How do you lead a capital campaign? Here’s a step-by-step playbook.
  • Every pastor can execute a capital campaign; it’s not that complex. Having clarity as to WHY you are running a capital campaign and HOW this connects to God’s better future is what makes a campaign successful.
  • You can move from being intimidated about a capital campaign to being encouraged to fund a bigger dream for your church.
  • Don’t be so insecure as a young leader; your identity is not found in being the hero… Jesus is the hero.
  • You do not have to have every answer. Jesus is ok with the real you.
  • Authentic relationships with people who know and love you serve to bring out the real, imperfect version of who you are.

Breakthrough resources:

Capital Campaign Playbook by Greg Gibbs

The Great Emergence by Phyllis Tickle

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality by Peter Scazzero

Greg Gibbs was raised in the Philadelphia area but set down roots in the suburbs of Detroit. As the son of an IBM executive, his instincts for leadership were shaped early. He studied Organizational Communication as an undergrad and holds a master’s degree in Theology.  After years of pastoral leadership in churches, Greg turned his attention to consulting and has spent time traveling the country working with church leaders.

Greg is both a practitioner and consultant. He holds an adjunct position as Director of Organizational Advancement for Kensington Church – serving his home church by leading Church Planting and Leadership Development initiatives. Kensington is a multi-site church and has helped fund and coach over 70 church plants around the country.

After 15 years of consulting and having helped raise over $150M for various churches, Greg joined Auxano in late 2016 as a Lead Navigator. He helps senior leadership with Vision Clarity, Long-Range Planning, and Resourcing through Capital Campaigns and Generosity Development. He is the author of Capital Campaign Playbook: An Insider Look at a Church Consultant’s Game Plan.

Greg has been married to Andrea for 28 years and they have four children, one daughter-in-law, two dogs named Walter and Gustavo, and like to roast their own coffee with beans they purchase at the Eastern Market in downtown Detroit.

 

Episode #17: Nick Floyd

Episode #17: Nick Floyd

Breakthrough ideas in this episode: 

  • It is essential to stop and recount the faithfulness of God. Keep memorials in front of yourself and your people to mark how God has moved.
  • What are the characteristics of a church built on dynamic worship and strong biblical teaching look?
  • You cannot reach your community until you know your community.
  • First, understand the culture you are called to reach, and then be intentional in how you lead them in, and toward, the gospel.
  • What are the front door events within your church that engage those in your community who wouldn’t naturally attend on a Sunday morning?
  • What is the difference in being a college church versus being a church with an active ministry to college students?
  • Being a church for every generation means being wise and intentional with everything you do… from how you worship to how you dress.
  • What is your standard of excellence in reaching people? Does this standard affect everything – even how you dress?
  • How do you steward and strengthen standards of excellence within the culture of your church?
  • Young leaders can reach older generations in a professional culture, as well as build confidence, by being intentional in small ways, even down to how they dress.
  • Your building only limits your ability to reach people in the ways that you allow it to. Thinking beyond the box is a critical skill.
  • Constantly, identifying and developing new leaders is the key to maintaining healthy systems and sustaining growth.
  • Leverage natural moments of connection, like Christmas and Easter, to recruit and engage new people in serving.
  • Volunteer leaders who are invested help recruit new volunteer leaders. Sold out leaders call out leaders.
  • To grow people and to grow a church, the staff must have the heart to raise and enlist others to do ministry, not just do it all themselves.
  • Continually re-establish the culture of development among your staff. You cannot rest on past recruiting success, even for a week.
  • Great people developers are leaders who are always with people. It’s not that hard.
  • When you are with people and have the heart to serve people, development and impact happen.
  • Numbers aren’t everything, but they do provide insight to the health and growth of a church.
  • The misuse of numbers in the past often causes church leadership today to run from healthy, and even Godly, ways to connect and keep up with people.
  • Keeping track of numbers, especially baptisms, helps keep track of the effectiveness of your mission.
  • Numbers do not tell the whole story, but they do provide a snapshot of the health of your church because disciple-making is a multiplicative action.
  • Do not be afraid to set goals around things that seem to be only a work of the Holy Spirit, because God will work through your intentional leadership. Healthy goals act as a reminder to lead and serve people well.
  • Campus pastors will be continually jolted with the shock that they are not the senior pastor. Understand this and lead accordingly.
  • Second chair leaders must realize that they are not the leader; God has not placed them in the primary leadership role. Therefore trust what God is doing in that first chair leader, even if you disagree.
  • In the second chair role, when conflict arises, choose to affect what you can. Focus on the things that you can change, not those things you cannot.
  • There is something that God honors and blesses when people who are under God’s authority follow His leading.
  • What do you do after achieving a significant milestone like moving into a new building? How do you keep peoples’ focus on the mission, beyond just the means to accomplishing the mission?
  • Spend time with the Lord in reading the Bible, every day and keep a prayer list that keeps you focused.
  • Young leaders must know that you cannot skip over the next ten years of your life. You’re not ready for all that the Lord has for you and this season is training and preparation.
  • Let the Lord do what he wants to do in you, then wait for Him to bring the leadership to you.

 

Breakthrough resources: 

Master Plan of Evangelism by Robert Coleman

Intimacy with the Almighty by Charles Swindoll

A Tale of Three Kings by Gene Edwards

Dr. Nick Floyd serves as the Lead Teaching Pastor & Staff Leader for all four campuses of Cross Church Northwest Arkansas. He teaches weekly at the Fayetteville Campus. Nick received his Bachelor’s degree in Biblical Studies from Liberty University and his Master of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He obtained his Doctor of Ministry degree from Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. Nick is married to Meredith, and the couple has four children.

 

Episode #15: Doug Paul

Episode #15: Doug Paul

Breakthrough ideas with Doug:

  • How does a church begin as an accidental church plant?
  • If the Kingdom of God were to come to your town, would it look like your church?
  • Is a church a church until they hold their first worship service?
  • How does a church formalize a public witness as the body of Christ gathered?
  • What is our discipleship model? Does it work? – Core questions for every church according to Dallas Willard.
  • What are the character and competencies of Jesus that are transferrable to every member of your church? Here is one church’s approach.
  • The Five Fold Skills of East End Fellowship – the core things that every church leader should know and do.
  • Everybody says we need to make disciples, but in the end, are they just promoting another class or programmatic event? We must move into the marks of a growing disciple.
  • We signed up for the revolution of the Kingdom of God, and somewhere along the way ended up running a church. Just ask Doug.
  • Very few people have experienced life on life disciple-making, much less most of our church leaders. Here’s why.
  • What prompted your pastoral calling to begin with? Was it running more programs or reaching and discipling more people?
  • Are your people taking spiritual responsibility for being and making disciples? These are.
  • What if your church “normal” was everyone growing in a disciple-making relationship?
  • How do leaders move out of a programmatic cycle of ministry administration and into a disciple-making rhythm of growth?
  • What would happen if your church members did what Jesus said to do?
  • As it turns out, Jesus is the best disciple maker who ever lived.
  • If a church is thriving and flourishing, it is always through a team more than one leader.
  • What happens when the mission of your church moves from being run as an organization to being owned by every member?
  • Are we about the image of God in everyone or just in those who are most comfortable for us to reach?
  • Saying no to a lot of what you used to say yes to improves missional effectiveness and fights volunteer burnout.
  • How do you contextualize the mission of God in your neighborhood? Here’s how one church does it.
  • What is the most natural next step for your community to become a part of the body of Christ? Is it necessarily attending a service on Sunday morning?
  • What are the most effective ministry vehicles to carry your vision?
  • Do you care more about Justice or Jesus? How the missional movement can seem to be sidetracked.
  • How do you live in the tension of the whole of the Gospel?
  • Fight for being as passionate about personal holiness as we are communal holiness. Be as moved about your sins as you are societies ills.
  • Are we as moved to comment about our sin as much as we do government and community?
  • Are you a church in reaction to something or conviction of something? Here’s the difference.
  • If we are looking at what the next generation will wrestle with in the gospel… it will be between social justice and personal conviction.
  • What does a diverse, urban church ministry to reaching the millennial generation look like?
  • What if everything that you do in ministry up until age 55 was training for ministry from ages 55 to 75?
  • Stop leading ministry as if you have something to prove and instead becoming living proof of the gospel.
  • Are you sharing the good news of Jesus or the good behavior of a church member?
  • Discipleship is not an option… it is central to the good news of Jesus.

 

Breakthrough resources in this episode:

EastEndFellowship Kickstart Resources    Password: NoPlanB

Master Plan of Evangelism by Robert Coleman

The Divine Conspiracy by Dallas Willard

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson

 

Doug currently helps pastor a team-led church in the inner city of Richmond, VA. He’s the former Global Strategy Director for 3DM, has planted a multiplying missional church, transitioned a mega-church, and was a Teaching Pastor and Multi-Site Director at a multi-site mega church.

Additionally, he has come alongside a myriad of businesses, non-profits, and churches. Doug specializes in re-brands, creating savvy marketing execution and bringing strategic business innovation to increase disciple-making effectiveness. He’s married to Elizabeth, a C-Suite advertising & brand executive for MullenLowe US. They have three precocious and joy-filled kids: Avery, Jude and Sam. And quite recently, they brought a Great Dane puppy into the family!

 

Episode #14: Marty Jacumin

Episode #14: Marty Jacumin

Breakthrough ideas with Marty:

  • How can a church effectively reach all five of the generations alive today?
  • Wake Forest University is not in Wake Forest, North Carolina, and other learning.
  • Young leaders leaving seminary have a far greater chance to end up in a multigenerational traditional church.
  • Leading a multigenerational church may just be the most exasperating, frustrating thing you will love with all your heart. It is for this pastor.
  • The older generation can, and should provide as much energy as they provide wisdom in your church.
  • Learn to lead your ideal church right where you are… don’t just hunt for it somewhere else.
  • The vast majority of churches are less than 200 in attendance… and most new pastors will step into a small church with an older generation.
  • If you want all generations to participate in the vision, cast a vision from which every generation can lead.
  • If we can get younger leaders and older leaders working together, it shows every generation the value of the other.
  • Love and shepherd people, don’t just try to change them.
  • When your people know you love them and that you want to shepherd them, they will respond to your leadership and the changes you know need to happen.
  • People will stand in the rain to watch their kids sing.
  • What could happen if you took your traditional church events out into the community?
  • Look at what you’re already doing and cast a vision to the church to leverage events to reach the community.
  • If your goal is to make people happy, sell ice cream. Not everybody wants to reach people; some will just want their preference in church.
  • Living into your unique personality and calling brings great freedom. Living without that clarity feels like a prison where someone else holds the key.
  • We don’t make hard decisions to hurt people, but sometimes we make hard decisions that hurt people.
  • Embracing the beauty of every generation, not just the difficulty in leading every generation, brings new life into a church.
  • Lead your people to understand that they wake up on the mission field everyday… they don’t have take trips overseas to be on the mission.
  • How can your church be more strategic through partnerships in reaching the community right around you?
  • Don’t try to become the leader you think people think you should be, become the leader you God has created and is calling you to be.
  • What are the challenges, as well as the benefits, of succeeding a long-tenured pastor who wants to stick around the church?
  • Staying until you are old enough to retire is not a vision for your church… it is a vacuum that often sucks much of the life out of the church.
  • Spend time with your spouse every day. Listen to what they are telling you about what they see in your leadership.
  • Get the leadership input from those who are closest to you, because they know you best and love you the most.
  • Just because someone questions what you are doing, it does not mean they are opposed to you or what you are doing.
  • Questions do not mark an adversary; they often mark an advocate who needs more information than you are giving.
  • Shepherd your family as much as you shepherd your church.

Breakthrough resources in this episode:

Bay Leaf Church

Collaboration Cube

Brothers, We Are Not Professionals by John Piper

Dangerous Calling by Paul David Tripp

Dr. Marty Jacumin was born and raised in the Foothills of North Carolina. He married his beautiful wife, Lori, in 1991 and they have three children. Marty is a graduate of NC State University and Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he also serves as an adjunctive preaching professor. Marty has served Southern Baptists as a trustee at Southeastern Seminary and North Carolina Baptists on the State Board of Directors. Marty also was privileged to be the President of the North Carolina Baptist State Convention Pastors’ Conference in 2010. He has a great conviction and passion for preaching God’s Word. Marty’s desire to see the lost come to faith in Christ and to see believers discipled is evident in his writing, his preaching, and his everyday life.

 

Episode #13: Kelly Kannwischer

Episode #13: Kelly Kannwischer

Breakthrough ideas with Kelly:

  • Building a strong leadership culture brings out the best in all of your leaders.
  • Churches are generally great at helping people live out their general calling, but it takes high intentionally to grow people within their special calling.
  • What is God’s calling for you, in this life stage, at your location, with your circumstances and your specific gifts and talents?
  • There are only two questions a church should ask: What is our process for making disciples? Is it working?
  • How does your church help every member understand and live out their unique identity?
  • There is a distinction between a person’s calling and their vocation.
  • The church can unintentionally place volunteers into roles that affect the joy of living in their calling
  • Churches have an opportunity to shift the leadership culture from “What do we want from people?” to identifying and releasing people to live into their call.
  • How can the church be viewed as a place where strength, skill, and expertise help it become a disciple-making training ground for everyday life?
  • The church can and should be the training ground for gospel-centered life design.
  • What if your church had the reputation of developing called people to such a degree that marketplace leaders look there first for new employers?
  • What is gospel-centered life design? What does that look like in the church?
  • If we are going to ask questions about our identity, we must ask them in the context of our creator and His unique design for us.
  • Our calling is revealed over a lifetime when we see God’s shaping of our life as discipleship.
  • Learning how to listen as leaders is often more important than learning how to speak.
  • You can make better decisions by asking questions out of security and peace.
  • Questions from your other leaders are not necessarily those people questioning you.
  • Strength and vulnerability are twin ideas, not opposites.
  • Productivity looks different in different seasons of life. Sometimes just getting the chores done is the highest form of accomplishment.
  • Success should be measured less in how much money you make and more in how you live out your unique life call.
  • When people get an insight into the power of their call and begin to live in it, they have an even greater idea into the calling of the church.
  • How can personal clarity within your congregation engage the organizational clarity of your church?
  • When the people receive the gift of calling, it makes it easier to obtain and engage the leadership pipeline of the church.
  • Take the long view, there should be a sense of urgency in your work, but urgency shouldn’t lead to panic in the system.
  • God wants you to be a whole healthy person, as much as He wants you to be a productive, intentional leader.

Breakthrough resources in this episode:

Peachtree Church Atlanta

Vanguard University

Younique

Link to Younique Preview

Girl Meets God by Lauren Winner

Divine Conspiracy by Dallas Willard

Kelly Kannwischer has spent her vocational life as a not-for-profit executive, consultant, and development professional. Before becoming the CEO of Younique, Kelly founded OptUp Consulting, served THINK Together as the Chief Engagement Officer, and led Vanguard University as a Vice President and President of the Vanguard University Foundation. Kelly graduated from the University of Virginia and earned her Masters degree from Princeton Theological Seminary. She is married to Rev. Dr. Richard Kannwischer and is the proud mother of two teenage girls.

Episode #12: Danny Franks

Episode #12: Danny Franks

Breakthrough ideas with Danny:

  • When God says “I am doing something…” words begin to create worlds.
  • Learn why nobody wants to give their life away to show up and help somebody find a parking space.
  • Why serving on a hospitality team is a lot of fun for about three weeks but becomes a lousy hobby if there is no substance.
  • If all we are calling people to do is show up to check off a box, they will only be excited for a short time. Train for this instead.
  • How vital is a welcoming ministry in a church where there is so much emphasis on the gospel and missions?
  • Is a First Impressions ministry essential? Answering this question with the Gospel is critical, here’s why.
  • Could it be that there roles in the church that we are presenting as family chores? Serving should never feel like taking out the garbage.
  • There are plenty of opportunities to offend people and make them uncomfortable when you see with first-time guest eyes.
  • We can do everything possible to make 60-75 minutes inside the worship service flawless, but if we are not thinking through what somebody sees first, it may not matter.
  • Do we need to ask – what do they see first?
  • Make sure that the messages from the stage hold up to the messages on the sidewalk.
  • The gospel is offensive but nothing else should be, especially your welcome.
  • Guests far from God may disagree with points of your sermon, but they cannot argue with the love of your people.
  • There are all kinds of offenses on a Sunday that we can fix… the gospel is one offense we shouldn’t try to fix.
  • If we make it feel like we love people, we planned for them, and we cannot wait for them to come back, people hostile to the gospel will eventually take hold.
  • Helping people understand the purpose behind needed changes is critical to keeping volunteer hearts engaged.
  • The why behind The Summit’s hospitality begins and ends with the gospel.
  • The big win of the weekend is that everyone hears the gospel communicated.
  • The Summit First Impressions Plumbline: The gospel is offensive, nothing else should be
  • The Summit First Impressions Plumbline: The why is more important than the what.
  • The Summit First Impressions Plumbline: Everything speaks.
  • The Summit First Impressions Plumbline: The first visit should set up the second visit
  • The Summit First Impressions Plumbline: Make it personal – every weekend is someone’s first weekend, meet people where they are
  • The why has to be more caught than taught. People should understand what matters most beyond just hearing words at a training meeting.
  • Leaders must be present and in conversation to ensure that culture is stewarded well from campus to campus.
  • Stories are the most significant indicator of cultural health.
  • Asking guests about their experience is a way to hear from guests and listen for systemic issues in your hospitality experience.
  • The first time guest experience is a health indicator for the entire church.
  • Stats don’t grab people’s hearts the way stories do… tell stories to motivate and to cultivate the results you want to see.
  • Gospel discipleship in every ministry means that people can move from parking cars to planting churches.
  • The majority of guest services conversations are transactional, but are your people available to connect beyond the welcome and into the relational?
  • The bare minimum number of volunteers result in the bare minimum number of gospel experiences.
  • You always need more volunteers – more people engaged in the mission creates more opportunities to engage people.
  • There has to be a passion for the guest experience… your volunteers need to see welcoming people as more than just family chores.
  • Nobody dreams of being a guest services pastor, but the reality is that Biblical hospitality is a critical component of following Jesus.
  • Guest Services are a biblical virtue expressed on an organizational level.
  • Essential Qualities of a Great Hospitality Leader: People person, Attention to detail, Dreamer not afraid to take measured risks
  • We don’t always need to learn something new; we need to revisit the truth over and over again.
  • Leaders sharpen their tools by reading – and not just leadership books.
  • You can engineer EPIC moments to engage First Time Guests.
  • Relax… let go of the perfect plan and the ideal event. Outside of salvation, there are very few things in ministry that are as life and death as we think they are.
  • We can sacrifice people on the altar of our idol the plan.
  • We are not here for the plans we are here for the people.

Breakthrough resources in this episode:

The Summit Church RDU

People Are The Mission by Danny Franks

Start with Why by Simon Sinek

A Praying Life by Paul Miller

Switch by Chip & Dan Heath

The Power of Moments by Chip & Dan Heath

Danny Franks is the Pastor of Guest Services at the Summit Church in Durham, North Carolina, where he’s served since 2003. In that role, he oversees guest services for ten campuses across the Triangle region of North Carolina, reaching over 11,000 people each weekend. He’s married to Merriem (out of his league), dad to three boys (cooler than he was at their age), and protector of one princess (cute as a button). Danny’s passion for the church is to help outsiders become insiders, and challenging insiders to reach outsiders. He is the author of People Are the Mission: How Churches Can Welcome Guests Without Compromising the Gospel, which released in March 2018. He’s a regular blogger at dannyfranks.org and a regular twit @LetMeBeFranks.

Episode #11: Cal Rychener

Episode #11: Cal Rychener

Breakthrough ideas with Cal:

  • What does church planting look like 30 years in?
  • How does a church move from program driven to presence driven after years of ministry success?
  • It’s possible to go deep with your weekend sermons and still be responsive to those who are not in a relationship with Christ.
  • If someone is visiting your church these days, they are looking for something meaningful, do not hold back on the presence of the Lord in worship.
  • Pastors, you can teach for maturity and still talk toward salvation.
  • Listen to your desert – when the desert is happening in your heart, the Lord wants to teach you there.
  • You can be a balanced church in the Word and the Spirit.
  • It is possible to be charismatic without being weird.
  • Never be without a swing coach, you need somebody who knows what you don’t and sees what you can’t.
  • We are the only church in the world that has our mission statement, and that is how it should be.
  • Your mission should roll off your tongue with excitement and speak life in every word.
  • What does it look like when a church truly believes Jesus came to break the chains that are still holding you?
  • Is there life in every word and passion in every syllable when you speak the mission?
  • Leadership gets tough when you are not clear on the mission that God has called you to.
  • Why is it important to have your team in the room when developing the vision, isn’t it easier to do it on your own?
  • What does visionary collaboration look like?
  • Collaboration builds a team that will fight for your values and your culture, not just own it because they are told to or paid to.
  • We shouldn’t be afraid of surfacing the misalignment on the team.
  • Don’t be afraid to find out if you have someone on the team who doesn’t share the vision.
  • What does it mean to cast your faith forward and your fear backward?
  • In staff transitions or seasons of change, the tendency is to cast our fear forward instead of casting our faith forward.
  • Your fears can keep you stuck.
  • Making the church planting shift – here’s one pastor who would instead look back at 20 pastors he raised than 20 locations that lower a screen.
  • What is the difference between a church planter and a campus pastor?
  • What happens when the multisite model becomes an obstacle to pastoring in the local context?
  • What might a hybrid model of church planting and multisite campusing look like?
  • Be who you are not who someone else is. Do not deny who God has called you to be.
  • Spend time with the Lord in personal practice, not pastoral theory.
  • If you were not a pastor, would you still live as you live?
  • Refuse to sacrifice your family to lead your church.
  • Are you the same person at home than you are on the stage?
  • Live out of your heart what God has called you to live and your legacy will take care of itself.

Breakthrough resources in this episode: 

Northwoods Community Church

God Dreams by Will Mancini

All Hail the Power of Jesus Name

The Hour That Changes the World by Dick Eastman

Originally from Archbold, Ohio, Pastor Cal Rychener graduated from Fort Wayne Bible College and went on to earn a Masters of Divinity degree from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. In addition to his love for the local church, Cal has two other great passions. First and foremost are his wife Susan and their family: Kathryn, Andy, Avery, Madilyn and Blake Rogers; Jonathon, Michaela, Arianna and Joanna Rychener; Victoria and Kody Pinson; and Nathan Rychener. Running a distant second is his love for the Green Bay Packers, for whom he has been a guest chaplain. He has been the senior pastor of Northwoods Community Church since its beginning in 1990. Cal is also the author of the books Living at a Higher Level of Faith and God Can.

Episode #10: Chris Driver

Episode #10: Chris Driver

Breakthrough ideas with Chris:

  • The ethos of six-man football reflects the grit and resilience of small-town life on the west Texas plains. It also inspired this church’s vision.
  • Who will reach the small town? Who will take the gospel to those places that were once the center of life in our rural communities?
  • This church of 80 has plans to plant 100 churches, and God is providing in exciting every resource they need. How was your weekend?
  • Three church planting breakthroughs from the south plains of west Texas.
  • What does church planting look like in the small towns of west Texas? Learn about Fifth Street Baptist’s disciple-making mission points.
  • What does authentic and effective discipleship look like in a small town?
  • Small town residents understand living in community – you don’t have to teach that. But they desperately need to experience Christ-centered community.
  • You don’t have to teach community and caring for each other in the small town, you just need to connect it to Gospel purpose.
  • God delights in using small things in big ways. Here is an example from the southern plains of west Texas.
  • How do we let our people truly invest in each other’s lives? Community is bigger than just having Sunday school or small groups.
  • What happens when a church has a lot of history but not a lot of legacy?
  • Years spent in existence as a church do not automatically amount to multiplication influence in the community by the church. Hear the story of one established church leaving a legacy.
  • This church believes that reaching 10 people in 100 small towns is the way that a church of 80 can reach 1000 people each week.
  • Relationships overcome geography when discipleship looks like this.
  • What happens when you really believe that discipleship is for every believer not just the spiritually elite?
  • Claim ownership of your own discipleship first. Stop waiting for someone to disciple you and start being a disciple maker.
  • Effectiveness in the small town means that every man woman and child can realistically hear the gospel and have a chance to respond. Here is one way.
  • A church of 80 attendees has planted five churches in the last 18 months. How is your multiplication strategy working?
  • Smaller is easier to reproduce. There is something to being a simple church in simple places with simple people sharing a simple message.
  • Is your operational vision bigger than just more people in weekly worship? It should be.
  • You can sometimes make people do what you want them to do, but vision ownership like this goes beyond getting what you want to be done.
  • What happens when a church starts the multiplication process as soon as they start meeting. What does it mean to be “born pregnant” as a church?
  • God has not forgotten the small town. He has a plan and a purpose to do big ministry in small places.
  • Get out of the office. You cannot influence people you’re not in contact with.
  • Busyness in the office does not equate to effective ministry. Ministry “along the way” reflects the way of Jesus.
  • Irresponsible vision reflects an indescribable God. Be faithful with what He has given you and leave the results to Him.

Breakthrough resources in this episode: 

Fifth Street Baptist Church

Exponential Conference

God Dreams by Will Mancini

Download the whole Fifth Street story: Big Vision for Small Places

Real Life Discipleship by Jim Putman

Chris Driver is the Senior Pastor of Fifth Street Baptist Church in Levelland, Texas. Chris enjoys coaching youth sports and is passionate about the sport of six-man football.